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Good-Bye to a Beautiful Woman

(Extracurricular Activities and Faith-Based Involvement, Class of 2017) Permanent link
Culp Photo I might have mentioned before that, whenever I’m asked what the best part about the Academy is, my response is automatically the people here. What I want to impress upon all my blog readers, however, is that by “people”, I don’t just mean cadets or active duty Coast Guardsmen. I’ve certainly been touched by and learned much from those people, but there are also people who don’t work inside the Academy or live in the barracks who have changed my life. As we speak, one of the Officer’s Christian Fellowship field leaders, Betsy Teuton, lays in Yale Hospital waiting for the Lord to call her to His Kingdom.

 

Never have I met such a wonderful woman, such a good-hearted person. She always had love to spare, for her cadets and for anybody who walked in and out of her life. Betsy has been fighting cancer for the past few years, with a strength and faith I’ve never seen in anyone else. She’s an inspiration, that’s for sure. If she can face that battle with the courage she has, I know any cadet can get through the challenges of Coast Guard life. Her selflessness is amazing; her spirit and positivity are contagious; and her peace, her faith even as we all say good-bye soars above all fear and sadness.

 

You can only begin to realize how many lives she changed when cadets are arriving in 15-passenger vans and booking train tickets back to New London just to say their farewells. She was like a mother to them, just like she was and still is to me. We remember Betsy as she crosses the bar, and I personally give God thanks and praise for her presence in my life and in the life of the Coast Guard Academy. Good-bye to a beautiful, God-filled woman – she will be missed, but celebrated in our lives from here on out.

 

More about Abby.

 

Hello :)

(Academics, Athletics, Class of 2016) Permanent link
Daghir Photo I am just taking a break from writing a paper for Fisheries Biology class and decided that there was no better time to take a moment to let you into my semester. WE HAVE REACHED MIDTERM. It is honestly crazy and very hard for me to grasp this and on top of that, I have just this past weekend finished fall ball for lacrosse with a play day in Massachusetts. Most of my classes are going well, and I have to say I am enjoying myself thoroughly in each of my endeavors as a cadet this year. I have found a good spot in Delta company, and as I member of the regimental planning division, I write the scripts for drill and have also with my roommate somehow advanced to seating the VIP guests for regimental drill.

 

I am having a great time on the cheerleading although this is the part in the season when the cold becomes just a little much and the wind equally as rough. Luckily, though, we have new running suits for warmth, and the cheering has been exciting this year.

 

In terms of my studies, I am very involved in my Marine and Environmental Sciences curriculum, conducting fish trawls on the river, presentations on Thames River fish populations, and discussing the importance of conservation of endangered marine species. It is weird but I have found that between football and lacrosse and homework and studying, I really haven’t had much free time, but I am happy to say that despite my many weekends spent at the Academy, I have enjoyed the free Sunday evening yoga classes and just relaxing on campus. The fall colors are exceptional, and I was lucky enough to get a room with a view of the river.

 

Parents’ Weekend is coming up and I am really looking forward to their visit. We are going to watch the football game and I am excited to show off our spirit with the cheerleaders.

 

GO BEARS, BEAT ENDICOTT!

 

More about Lucy.

 

In a Flash

(The Cadet Experience, Class of 2017) Permanent link
Corbett Photo Last year upperclassmen said it all the time. “Trust me after 4/c year this place flies by.” Here I sit with midterms behind me and Thanksgiving staring me down. I remember being in Swab Summer thinking it was the longest seven weeks of my life and now life is a steady stream flowing day to day. So what have I learned thus far in the semester?

 

Other than all the crazy electrical engineering knowledge that is being crammed in my brain, there have been a few Academy lessons. Like I said, this semester has flown by. After all, time stops for no man. Sometimes people become so busy and caught up in life you forget to just breathe and take in your surroundings. Looking around the Academy and across the Thames, all the trees have changed to their fall wardrobe of oranges, yellows, and reds. (Which, if you have never been to the Academy or New England, is truly breathtaking). Taking in the small moments is difficult but necessary to stay sane. If you don’t stay caught up in work you will just become overloaded, frustrated, and stress. I try to keep stress out as much as possible.

 

Being a 3/c is very different from being a 4/c. For obvious reasons such as: not having to square, not having to take out trash, etc. Bigger than that however, the respect that comes with the new title is relieving. 4/c look to you for advice, for help, and as someone who is above them who has the wisdom of a year under their belt. Which is true, 3/c are the “friendlies.” We are not the enforcers or trainers. Our role is to set the example and help the 4/c pass the year. Now I might not know everything, but when I hear “Mr. Corbett sir” I am sure to stop and help however I can.

 

I feel like I usually give some kind of quote in my posts so I will leave you with “Every silver lining has a touch of grey.” –Grateful Dead. Everyone has plans. You have some sort of path of which you hope to travel. You can travel that silver lining all you want, but you have to understand that sometimes the path may be rocky, or may stray off. If you push through the hard times and stay on that silver lining you will reach your goals and ultimately live happier. The Academy was my silver lining and continues to be, but there are some hard times. You look to your left and right and see your shipmates alongside you to carry you through those tough times. The family aspect of this place could be a post on its own so maybe next time. For now I am signing off.

Reach me at Shane.P.Corbett@uscga.edu.

 

More about Shane.

 

Three Part of Third Class Summer

(Choosing the Coast Guard Academy, Just for Fun, Class of 2017) Permanent link
Sandri Photo Third class summer at the Academy is divided into three main portions: sailing on the cutter Eagle, experiencing time in the fleet/attending summer school, and going on leave. I was assigned to spend the first five weeks of my summer aboard Eagle followed by six weeks at Station Golden Gate.

 

Eagle was certainly an experience. Our days were filled with double four-hour watches, damage control trainings, working on required tasks such as star shooting and drawing the ship’s firemain system, learning the system of lines so we could help work the ship more efficiently, and of course prepping for in-port duty and liberty. Captain Pulver, the CO, said he wanted to keep us busy, and he definitely succeeded! Here are a few things that made Eagle memorable:

  • My division. Aboard the ship, we attended trainings and stood watches with a group of other 3/c cadets, all under the watch of a 1/c cadet. Although a midnight watch in the engine room may not seem like fun, we made it enjoyable by having discussions and playing lots of games. I couldn’t have survived the five weeks without them!
  • Sometimes, the FS (food service specialist) on duty would make pumpkin cinnamon rolls for people who had the night watch. This always made my night!
  • Spotting wildlife. The Atlantic Ocean is teeming with flying fish, and we would occasionally spot whales or dolphins. It was so exciting to spot them while standing lookout, or waiting during sail stations.
  • The water was colored such a brilliant electric blue around the Caribbean, no wonder there’s a paint color called Caribbean Blue! Not to mention the clarity…you could see directly to the bottom when we pulled into port.
  • Climbing up the masts to pull in or let down sails. The view was incredible, and this was a really special job we got to do.
  • The port calls were amazing. We walked through a 500-year-old fort in San Juan, snorkeled in a natural pool in Aruba, and danced with street musicians in the lively streets of Cozumel.
  • I got to know my classmates better. There are some awesome people in my class who I hadn’t really talked to before, but when you’re together on a 295-foot pirate boat, you get to know each other pretty well.
  • Disconnecting. When you’re underway, there’s no cell service or WIFI access, so we found other ways to entertain ourselves. Sometimes it reminded me of grade school days, in a good way. Frequent time-occupiers included the alphabet game, Never Have I Ever, and writing letters.

 

When we pulled into Miami, we went our separate ways. Three other cadets and I flew to Station Golden Gate in Sausalito, California. It was the busiest unit in the Coast Guard last year and is nestled next to its namesake bridge. These are just a few things from my time in the fleet:

  • The enlisted crew at the station was the best that I could ask for. They were able to more than competently get the job done while maintaining a relaxed atmosphere around the grounds. This was especially important because of the high-stress nature of cases around the San Francisco Bay area, and it was neat to see how the crew members manage themselves with little officer interaction. They were extremely knowledgeable and helpful as we worked on qualifying as communications watchstander and boat crew member for the 47-foot motor lifeboat.
  • I definitely got spoiled by Sausalito’s moderate climate and breathtaking views. There was time allotted for exercise almost every day, and I mostly used it to go on runs downtown. Sausalito is a small, artsy city across from San Francisco, and it was beautiful to run through.
  • SAR cases. We got to experience the life-saving service at the heart of the Coast Guard. No matter what time of day, when the alarm went off there was always a crew racing to the docks to save someone. On the days we were on the first responder boat, we would join the crew on cases. By the end of the summer, I had gotten to pick up kite surfers in distress, tow boats, recover bridge jumpers, break in comms watch for a suspected drug interdiction, and so much more.
  • The station dog, Sierra, was always there to take on walks and play with. The crew was allowed to bring in their own dogs too, and once we took three of them on a four-mile walk downtown.
  • Weekends were ours to use as we wanted. I spent time visiting family and friends in the area, hiked Muir Woods, toured San Francisco and spent one weekend working on qualifications.
  • Scary movie night! Somehow I agreed to watch The Conjuring for Scary Movie Monday at the station…never again.

 

3/c summer was definitely the best Academy summer yet. It feels like we packed so much training into the 11 weeks, which were followed by three weeks of leave. After this culminating end to 4/c year, I’m excited to see what the new year has in store!

 

More about Eva.

 

Getting Involved is Fair-ly Easy (Cadet Activities Fair)

(Extracurricular Activities and Faith-Based Involvement, Just for Fun, Class of 2015) Permanent link
Sherman Photo We have many clubs and activities here at the Coast Guard Academy. And we have a fun way to find out what extracurricular options are available each year: the Cadet Activities Fair! It’s on the Thursday of the first week of school (sorry for the delay…I had some technical difficulties while editing). This video is a fun exposition of that event. Hear about anything you’re interested in?

*Special thanks to artist Har Megiddo for the use of his music in this video.

Justin's video blog YouTube Icon

 


More about Justin.