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CADET BLOGS

cadet blogs

Spring Track and Field

(Athletics, Class of 2018) Permanent link
Burchill Photo The Academy isn't just all academics and military, thletics plays a big part! I run track and cross country and love my teammates and the sport. From hanging out at meets, to working hard alongside one another everyday, I wouldn't trade these people for the world. They really help you get through the tough times.

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More about Rachel.

 

Five Flights Later…

(The Cadet Experience, Class of 2017) Permanent link
Culp Photo Time flies when you’re having fun, and in my case, there actually was flying involved! My classmates and I just finished first phase of our last year of summer training, during which I was at Air Station Clearwater, Florida. First class summer is special because out of the four, you get the most influence in crafting a summer schedule that is pertinent to your career goals and interests. For me, that means I had the air station assignment, as I am putting in for flight school in the fall, and am now in New Hampshire for an academic internship with the Cold Regions Research and Engineering Lab run by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. You’ll hear more about the latter as I get further into the assignment; but for now, let me tell you all about playing on helicopters for five weeks! (I mean, calmly observing from a safe distance. They knew better than to let me get too close to expensive equipment.) I got to ride along on two C-130 flights and three H-60 flights, and got qualified to stand the Operations Duty Officer (ODO) watch. The helicopters were a blast; nothing beats flying with the door open and seeing the world beneath you. But then again, getting time actually flying the C-130 was incredible… there are definitely positives to both fixed-wing and rotary! The ODO watch involved me receiving calls for search and rescue cases from the sector and district, and helping manage the general operational picture for the daily activity of the air station. It’s a great way to actually help out the air station and give the pilots a small break from their busy schedules.

 

So both the flying and the watches were good experiences; but, the highlight for me was definitely meeting all the wonderful people at the air station. The aviation community is full of people who truly care about each other, and who love being pilots for the Coast Guard. I learned so much from hearing about each of their experiences and unique backgrounds, and found some individuals whose values and career paths aligned precisely with my own. Some showed me what it means to be a skilled and highly proficient pilot; some demonstrated to me what it means to take care of others and watch out for their well-being; some displayed the positive attitude and sense of humor necessary to make it through challenging assignments; still others helped me understand what goes into an aviation career from start to finish, including families and graduate school. It was such an invaluable experience; definitely one of the best I have had since reporting in. I’m all the more grateful to have spent time with the Clearwater crew, because amazingly, this fall will mark the start of my journey into the aviation community when I start preparing my flight school application! And let me tell you, spending five weeks at air station Clearwater has given me so much motivation to try my hardest and get into Coast Guard aviation. Praise God for first phase; stay tuned to hear about second phase in a few weeks!

 

More about Abby.

 

Looking Back at January

(The Cadet Experience, Class of 2018) Permanent link
Burchill Photo Returning from winter leave is hard but it's the start of a new semester. From new roommates to new sports, second semester is a breath of fresh air. Here is a little snap shot of what the Academy looks like in the cold month of January!

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More about Rachel.

 

Prepare to be Unprepared

(Overcoming Challenges, Class of 2018) Permanent link
Kimura Photo Swab Summer is something everyone forgets the bad from and remembers the good. When I prepared for the infamous Swab summer, I had the worst in mind coming from CGAS. The phrase “prepare for the worst, and hope for the best” does not even do justice to the training swabs go through. No matter the preparation, the simple tasks of Swab Summer often throw wrenches into visions swabs have going into it.

 

Take my summer for example; I went in physically fit; doing push-ups, rowers, flutter kicks, running, and all the other good stuff. But the day after my company got medically cleared and took the PFE, we went on a run in formation and I took a wrong step that sprained my ankle. Not thinking anything of it, I kept going. I was percolating and sprinting with my company for the rest of the morning. I kept this up until I felt a pop and pain seared throughout my ankle to the point of tears. I never could have prepared for the two nights I spent in the ward because the tear in my ligament caused my foot to swell and bruise like a balloon. Neither could I have prepared for the week following, when I tried to make up for my injury’s hindrance by moving as fast or faster than my shipmates doing change remedials, memorizing extra indoc, and putting the extra effort to show an injury would not stop me.

 

The summer will bring events one cannot prepare for in advance, whether an injury, family problems, personal revelations, or even culture shock. The best thing to do is go through it with an open mind, 100 percent effort because cadre can see right through those trying to just get by, and the company of your shipmates.

 

More about Amy.

 

Swab Summer: Ultimately About Teamwork

(Overcoming Challenges, The Cadet Experience, Class of 2017) Permanent link
Mills Photo To the Class of 2020,

 

I am already so proud of your accomplishments and perseverance to receive an appointment to the Coast Guard Academy, especially my cadet candidates from last summer. This summer, you are going to embark on the most challenging and rewarding journey of your life to date. Let me assure you, it will be worth it. Swab Summer is meant to test your emotional, physical and mental strength. You won’t be great at everything, and there are some things you may find easy. Make sure to share your strengths with your shipmates and allow your shipmates to share their strengths with you. Swab Summer is ultimately about teamwork; you don’t have to do it alone and you shouldn’t. If you haven’t been practicing push-ups, sit-ups and running, please start now. It will only make the transition to Swab Summer easier. Also, if you are not from a hot and humid climate, be prepared for the Connecticut summers because they can be blistering on some days. Take each day a meal at a time and realize that it is only seven weeks of the four years of training. Just try your best and help your shipmates when you can. Most importantly, there will be at least one person that struggles a lot during these seven weeks. Help that person who is struggling because you are only as strong as the weakest link in your company. Have fun! You are going to meet your best friends in life and make some good memories. Good luck 2020!!!

 

More about Sydney.