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CADET BLOGS

cadet blogs

Peer Tutoring

(Academics, The Cadet Experience) Permanent link
Ritchie Photo Being a 3/c means more involvement and responsibility within the corps. It also means a greater number of opportunities. Through the past five weeks of being back at the Academy, I’ve been offered many chances to become more involved in all three fields of cadet life: academics, athletics, and military. The clubs and activities fair wasn’t rained out this year, so I signed up for several clubs there. After 4/c year and having become accustomed to Academy life, I want to take advantage of more of the opportunities offered here.

 

During CAP week, I found out that I had been recommended by an English teacher to become a peer tutor. Peer tutoring at the Academy is a program where cadets are trained and qualified to help other cadets with academic assignments. A peer tutor must attend eight hours of training and can earn an academic grade and credit hour by logging 24 hours of tutoring over a semester.

 

Being an English peer tutor comes naturally to me. I’ve always valued creativity, but at a military academy, it can be a hard skill to maintain. Expressing thoughts through writing and encouraging others to do so is one way I keep in touch with my creative side.

 

It is also a great opportunity to help other cadets succeed. Certain collaboration policies allow for only help from peer tutors or instructors, and some people are more comfortable asking other cadets for help than approaching teachers. Additionally, meeting with someone in Chase Hall is a lot more convenient than having to hike to an academic building at night. This is one of the great things about the Academy; there are so many ways to get help. Unlike an ROTC program where not everyone understands the challenges you face, everyone here is going through or has been through relatively the same thing. People are more than willing to help each other. There are countless support systems to help a person succeed if utilized.

 

If you have any questions, please contact me at Sarah.R.Ritchie@uscga.edu.

 

More about Sarah.

 

New Year, New Responsibilities

(Academics, Overcoming Challenges, Class of 2016) Permanent link
Schroeder Photo The new school year has finally started and I couldn’t be busier. After a seemingly short summer, this past month has been a blur. Over the summer, I had the opportunity to do a bunch of really cool things; my favorite being the Cadet Aviation Program (CATP), and the Coastal Sail Program.

 

For the CATP, I got to fly down to Elizabeth City, North Carolina for a week and ride on Coast Guard aircraft, both fixed wing and rotary. I also had the opportunity to get hoisted from the water into a helicopter, which is easily the coolest opportunity I have gotten while at the Academy.

 

The Coastal Sail Program is a two week transit on a 44-foot sailing yacht around New England to places such as Newport, Martha’s Vineyard, Block Island, Cape Cod and Nantucket. I was on a boat with seven of my classmates and a safety officer. This trip taught me a lot about leadership and what kind of leader I wanted to be because of the high amount of exposure to peer leadership. It was really cool to be sailing around New England and stop in such cool places as well.

 

The biggest thing of second class summer though is being cadre. I got to be Swab Summer cadre second phase, which was both tiring and rewarding. It served as a good transition into the school year because this fall I am my company’s guidon. The company guidon is basically the senior second class in charge of the training of the fourth class over the semester. Being Swab Summer cadre allowed me to get to know each of my fourth class very well, which has helped this semester.

 

Besides being guidon, I am very busy with my own academics and with rugby. This year is my major’s toughest year, and I am still trying to find a balance between school, sports, being guidon, and having a social life. Things are getting better each week though, and I am generally content with how life is going. I know that this semester will be very rewarding for me.

 

More about Jade.

 

The Major Leagues

(Academics, Class of 2017) Permanent link
Culp Photo My, oh, my! The school year’s ramped up so quickly that I missed a month! Well, y’all can’t get rid of me quite that easily, so here I am! Part of the reason I’ve been so busy is thanks to the return of that beautiful creature with which all Academy students are way too familiar – schoolwork! But, it’s a lot more entertaining for me this year. As a third class, cadets finally start taking classes that are specific to their major. For me as a Marine and Environmental Sciences major, those classes include meteorology, marine biology, and differential equations. Third class wind up with very heavy schedules because of that, but what else is new? It’s worth it to experience lab periods where we go out on a boat to collect plankton samples, or spend class time going through weather briefs! I love being a part of my major, and in talking to my classmates in other programs, I know they are also having a good time! It’s nice to finally start studying those topics for which I’ve been waiting since my first year here!

 

The Marine and Environmental Sciences major is one of the smaller ones, with only around 30 or so people in my class following its program. I consider it very valuable to Coast Guard operations – after all, to work in the ocean, we need to understand its characteristics, and to guard its inhabitants (as is one of our explicitly stated missions!), we have to expand our knowledge of how the environment works and what is threatening it. If you have any questions about being an MES major, or just Academy life in general, please feel free to email me at Abigail.A.Culp@uscga.edu! Beat Kings Point!

 

More about Abby.

 

Great to be a Senior

(Academics, Class of 2015) Permanent link
Cantrellt Photo It has been a busy, but GREAT start to the year! I finished up the summer at home in sunny Florida and then I was on my way (in my car) back to the Academy. It is great to be a senior, to have a car, to have liberty on Thursday nights, and to hold a leadership role within the corps. I already know this year will be the best year yet! Classes started yesterday so it was a lot of organizing and planning skills to get off on the right foot. I had previously had or met most of my teachers so it wasn’t a huge deal to start school. Although, I do know how the fourth class feel because that was me on my first day three years ago.

 

Last weekend I went to southern Maine with a group of girlfriends and we stayed at my friend’s house. It was a short trip, but I had so much fun! We went to watch Keelan Donovan sing and play the guitar with MamaDear then we explored Portland. We also walked on the beautiful beach and ate a great home cooked meal! It was a great first weekend back with all of my friends. This weekend is Labor Day so the corps will have Monday off and a group of girls and myself are off to hike Mount Washington in New Hampshire! The most hiking I have done was in Hawaii so we will see how this nine-mile hike goes...I might need some encouraging words from my friends half way up! Either way it will be an adventure and I can’t wait.

 

Of course I am staying focused on my studies and trust me the homework has already started. Lots of readings to do before bed so I should probably start that!

 

I hope everyone has a great start to the year and you hit the ground running with schoolwork and sports, but don’t forget to take some time to relax and enjoy the moment (it goes by faster than you think) I am always available for questions at Sara.E.Cantrell@uscga.edu.

 

More about Sara.

 

Kicking Off Fall Semester

(Academics, Class of 2017) Permanent link
Glick Photo With CAP week over, fall semester is about to kick off. The fall semester, so I have experienced last semester, is a term where each cadet, whether returning from leave, completing Swab Summer, or pumped up from coordinating cadre summer, is still learning their new roles as a cadet. The 1/c are either in command positions on Regimental or Company Staff, or are acting as division officers in one of the eight companies. The second class are finding themselves as budding leaders, having completed the execution of the Swab Summer training program, and are either re-buying into the system or growing weary of it, longing for graduation. The new cadets, having completed Swab Summer, wait for classes to start in anxiety, yet are jubilant having completed quite possibly the hardest summer of their lives. As third class cadets, we are still underclassmen, yet not leaders, but not quite followers. We are labeled as “role modelers” or those underclassmen who have been around the block, and need to guide the fourth class cadets to success in their first year. Third class, so I’ve been told by the brass at our meetings, is typically “the missing class” or the class at the Academy that fades into the background. There is an excellent opportunity to do the bear minimum as a third class, but there is also an excellent opportunity to find what you really enjoy, and more importantly, what you do not enjoy. CAPT Pulver, the Commanding Officer on Eagle, encouraged our class to use this precious time to find out who we are as cadets, and to not squander it.

 

I am excited to start the school year, and my schedule is packed tightly. This is potentially my hardest semester at the Academy, with some very challenging courses. Fortunately, I have a few classes that I am looking forward to as I progress into my major. Admittedly, I am nervous for a few of them, but my attitude from Swab Summer remains constant: if thousands before me have done it, so I can too and do it well at that. I am enjoying the privileges of 3/c year, and as one of my mentors put it today after church, I am “entering the final third of my cadet career.” That is to say, that the Academy experience is divided into three parts: swab summer, fourth class year, and the rest. In truth, Swab Summer did feel as long as fourth class year, and the first week of 3/c year was like it never happened it was so fast. This year, I hope to explore my personal interests, while also achieving the same level of academic and military success. I also hope to get into better shape…

 

That is the beauty of the Academy, the reason I wake up and put on uncomfortable leather shoes every day: we are all here for the same reason, and we will help each other out until the day we commission. Some of us struggle physically, others academically, but everyone here has something to offer, and has their own way of helping someone else out.

 

More about William.