Skip Navigation Links
APPLY | LOGIN | CREATE AN ACCOUNT | PARENTS | PROSPECTIVE CADETS | VIRTUAL TOUR | ESPAÑOL | SEARCH
FacebookFlickrTwitterYou Tube
CADET BLOGS

cadet blogs

Guam Greatness

(Just for Fun, The Cadet Experience, Class of 2015) Permanent link
Sherman Photo After two months on Sequoia and having crossed most of the Pacific Ocean, we finally reached its homeport: Apra Harbor, Guam! What an incredible place! And the third video of my “Pacific Journey to Guam” vlog series will show you some of what I was able to do there. My time there was short, but I got a lot of exploring in and had some pretty amazing experiences. Distinctly unique from the other tropical islands I visited this summer, Guam is home to incredible adventure, warm hospitality, and great memories.

*Special thanks to artist Har Megiddo for the use of his music in this video.

Justin's video blog YouTube Icon

 


More about Justin.

 

A Summer in Review

(Choosing the Coast Guard Academy, The Cadet Experience, Class of 2016) Permanent link
Stowes Photo Hello CGA blog readers! It’s that time of year again, when everyone returns from their awesome summer assignments with stories to share and classes to look forward to. I was pretty up to speed with my blogs about the 2/c summer experience up until I became a cadre and got pretty busy. So I won’t waste words talking about my first few summer activities: Range, Rules of the Road, T-boats, and aviation training. However, looking back on my summer, the highs and the lows, I have to backtrack to mid-May. In May, I went into the doctors’ office because my shoulder was all out of sorts. I had dislocated it during a rugby match in early May, and I knew it was time to get it checked out. After an MRI, I learned I had severely torn my labrum (shoulder) and chipped a bone in my shoulder as well. With Swab Summer weeks away, I decided to wait to have surgery until after summer training. I don’t write that because I want people to pity the situation, or for people to think that I’m tough. I write that because I chose to forgo surgery to train the Class of 2018, and that passion to train the incoming swabs was more important to me than surgery. I would dare so far as to say that many of my fellow cadre had the same sense of passion about it as I did. So, for all the parents and future cadets out there, please know that your cadre are passionate about training you, and they chose to do your cadre for a reason.

 

Anyway, fast forward a couple months from May, and Swab Summer was just around the corner. I was home for a week off but I couldn’t get Swab Summer off my mind. Instead of living it up for that week, I spent hours reading books on leadership and preparing physically to train the incoming swabs. Additionally, I set goals for myself as a cadre. I wanted to be fair and respectful foremost. However, I also wanted to be a teacher. As cadre 1, it is easy to slip into a role of being a strict disciplinarian, but I wanted to break from that. Additionally, I wanted to instill a sense of pride in the Coast Guard and to teach them about what we do, in the hopes that it would unite them as a team and motivate them to perform.

 

As cadre 1, my job was to break down the civilian identities of the swabs; basically train them on uniform standards and drill; introduce the core values; and basically indoctrinate them. That is a high set of expectations, and I was lucky enough to have an excellent section of cadre to work with. We meshed well with personalities and work well as a team. After about a week, we were rolling as a team, supporting each other, backing each other up, and balancing the work load/responsibilities. By the end of week two, we were exhausted. People don’t realize, but cadre work just as hard as the swabs if they are doing it right. In addition to leading from the front and doing all the physical work that the swabs do, we have to figure out how to train them most effectively, and we have to take care of their physical and mental needs (like clinic visits and chaplain/counselor visits). We would stay up long after the swabs went to sleep, for me often not going to sleep until after midnight. We would discuss the day, what went well or didn’t go well, medical appointments, and we would plan for the upcoming day. As the last week arrived, we were exhausted and spent, but we pushed on.

 

A Summer in Review (Continued) 

 

More about Hunter.

 

Summer Before Graduation

(The Cadet Experience, Class of 2015) Permanent link
Subramanian Photo First class summer for cadets is the final one and very rewarding in the preparation to be become officers in the United States Coast Guard. I had the wonderful opportunity to be stationed on the USCGC Adelie, an 87’ patrol cutter out of Port Angeles, Washington.

 

The location was amazing. Port Angeles is home to five Coast Guard cutters, a small boat station, and an air station. The town has a large Coast Guard presence, as well as being close to other Coast Guard locations, including Seattle, Washington and Astoria, Oregon.

 

Port Angeles is the northern point of the amazing Olympic National Park, which is more than 900,000 acres large. The park is ecologically diverse, with the Pacific coastline, the meadows of wildflowers, the mountain vistas, and the rainforests. I soon learned that eleven weeks was not nearly enough time to fully comprehend the beauty of the park.

 

I had a great time conducting Coast Guard missions aboard the Adelie. The Adelie’s primary missions are conducting escorts of Navy vessels, search and rescue, and security boardings of small craft in the Puget Sound. I learned so much from the crew, and I worked hard to get qualified in different positions. For example, I qualified as an in-port Officer of the Day (OOD), the Watchstander for the cutter while in port. This position leaves the entire cutter in my responsibility after the workday after the rest of the crew departs for home. It’s amazing that someone like me, at the young age of 21, was given such a great responsibility.

 

I learned so much in eleven weeks, and I cannot wait to return to the “real” Coast Guard next year. It was very rewarding to do what I did this summer, and I cannot wait to be able to continue as a career.

 

More about Kevin.

 

Kwajalein “Kwaziness”

(Just for Fun, The Cadet Experience, Class of 2015) Permanent link
Sherman Photo After departing Hawaii, Sequoia departed to Kwajalein Atoll, which is in the Marshall Islands. This video highlights the buoy tending work the cutter did while we were there. Exploring the small island of Kwajalein was fascinating—what an interesting little place to explore! Not many people can say they’ve been there. I hope you enjoy the second chapter of the “Pacific Journey to Guam” vlog series!

*Special thanks to artist Har Megiddo for the use of his music in this video.

Justin's video blog YouTube Icon

 


More about Justin.

 

What We Really Did on Eagle

(Overcoming Challenges, The Cadet Experience, Class of 2017) Permanent link
Ritchie Photo This summer, I had the opportunity to sail through the Caribbean on America’s Tall Ship. The first five weeks of summer I spent on Eagle with about 150 of my classmates and around 50 permanent crew members. (That’s a lot of people for only 295 feet of ship.) We got on board the day after the last final, and immediately started working. We loaded tons of food into the storage areas and then set sail.

 

While on Eagle, my shipmates and I had to work hard to earn sign-offs and qualifications. We were given packets at the beginning of the summer with lists of tasks to complete. Once we completed a task, a person qualified in that area would initial that we’d done so far. Once we had all the sign-offs for a category, we could take a board, an oral test, to earn that qualification. We were expected to be helm and lookout and engineering auxiliary qualified by the end of the five weeks. On top of these qualifications, we had several hours of damage control training and were able to take a written test at the end to earn that qualification. Additionally, in the first 11 days, while we sailed from New London to Puerto Rico, we had to memorize the names of all the lines on the ship and parts of a sail. We had to pass these two tests to earn liberty in the first port.

 

It was easy to get bogged down by the workload and close quarters, but I tried to stay positive. I was really looking forward to sailing the Caribbean after a long school year, but when I got to Eagle, I was surprised by all the work I found out we’d have to do between port calls. For the first few days, I was exhausted and not in the best mood, but I realized that my attitude would have to change if I wanted to make it through the summer. I took on a more optimistic approach, thinking about the great port calls that lay ahead and just the pure opportunity of it all. No other college students that I know get to take a five week field trip to amazing vacation spots with 100+ close friends for free. This opportunity was incredible, and I wasn’t going to waste it with any more negativity. When you live so close to so many people, though, their attitudes rub off on you. It became hard to not let other people’s attitude affect my goal to stay positive. I relied on the port calls to keep me going, and they made it all worth it. (See more in my next blog post.)

 

More about Sarah.