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Week 6: When Rubber Meets the Road

(Overcoming Challenges, The Cadet Experience, Class of 2015) Permanent link   All Posts
Sherman Photo Or maybe this week’s reflection blog should be called “When Rudder Meets the Ocean.” (It’s a poor pun, but oh well; maybe I’ll have better luck next time.)

 

Now, on to this week’s report and reflection. Whew was this a hard one! First week underway, and it was technically a short week because, due to crossing the International Date Line, we lost a day (we skipped forward—aren’t time zones crazy!?).

 

Where to start? This week was definitely a lot more hectic than last week. For the first few days it was non-stop for me and Andy. On top of standing watch—now as break-ins for junior officer of the deck (which I’ll explain in a bit)—we trained in drills, attended damage control (DC) classes, and added more collateral responsibilities to our work lists. For the first few days, as I got adjusted to the schedule, I had very little free time. I’ll walk you through the schedule and explain each thing as I go.

 

A day might start at by waking up at 0300 to get ready for watch on the bridge. On the bridge, I was working on my junior officer of the deck (JOOD) qualification. This means that I was the officer of the deck’s (OOD’s) assistant. The OOD is in charge of directing the ship’s movement (steering, navigation, etc.) and overseeing everything going on aboard the ship. The JOOD’s job is to assist with that oversight and to help take care of the admin associated with it. As JOOD, I recorded the weather, tracked our position, announced events on the cutter’s plan of the day (POD), monitored navigation equipment, and served as an extra set of eyes for lookout. It was a lot to do, but that helped the four-hour watch go by quickly. Of course, I was also working on demonstrating various proficiencies, such as how to take initial action upon report of an emergency, as I progress in the qualification process. And as always, it was enjoyable talking with the crewmembers on watch with me—it’s always exciting to hear about their past experiences, their goals, and their knowledge of the Sequoia. There are even some other members of the crew who were breaking-in JOOD with us. It was nice to have a partner or two to help learn and study the material—thank you Andy and BM3 Hall!

 

When the Rubber Meets the Road (Continued) PDF 


 


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