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NA&ME CAPSTONE DESIGN PROJECTS
  • Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering Capstone Overview


    CG Ship The Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering (NA&ME) Program contains a two-semester, team-based “clean sheet of paper” design of a ship by 1/c (senior) cadets, with close engagement by several faculty members with significant background and experience in ship design. This experience is embedded in, and directly supported by, three courses: Principles of Ship Design, Ship Propulsion Design, and Ship Design & Systems Integration.

    In August of each year, the current group of 1/c students is broken up into teams of either three or four students. This team works together for the entire academic year. The senior design classroom is collocated with six four-person “design suites” arranged to simulate what one might experience as a team-working environment in an entry level position at an engineering firm. Ship design skills are provided (or extended from prerequisite courses such as Principles of Naval Architecture or Ship Structures or Marine Engineering) in the classroom in a “just-in-time” fashion. Software skills learned in prerequisite classes are directly applied to the senior design work.

    Historically, the NA&ME students were assigned a Coast Guard ship to design. For the past several years, the NA&ME major has expanded the experience such that half of the teams design Coast Guard ships while half of the teams design a commercial vessel. The faculty is confident that this will be a permanent change. Cadets love the choice and the two types of ships fit perfectly with the NA&ME major’s shared constituency between the Coast Guard’s Naval Engineering and Prevention (commercial shipping) communities.

  • Stern Wave Bow Wave

    Year-Long Design Process


    Ship design projects are selected by faculty for their pertinence to current or evolving USCG missions or for their importance to U.S. and global commercial maritime interests. The pertinence of Coast Guard ship design to cadets is obvious and is related to the Program constituents within the USCG Naval Engineering community. The pertinence of commercial ship design to cadets is related to the Program constituents within the USCG Marine Safety Engineering/Prevention community and the Coast Guard’s regulatory oversight responsibilities within the world of commercial vessels.

    During the year-long ship design, faculty advisors to the teams effectively serve in the role of engineering supervisors. During the year, each team submits approximately twenty formal design “submittals” or reports. Each report covers a particular aspect of the design of the ship such as hull design, general arrangements, propulsion, damaged stability, electrical plant, model testing, ship motions, structures, or crewing. The reports are highly technical in nature, both in terms of writing style and content. Students are expected to use strong professional/technical writing to present their design decisions accompanied by adequate analysis and consideration of rules and/or standards.

    During this ship design process and the associated close interaction with faculty, cadets develop a wealth of technical skills, professional abilities, and communication competencies of undeniable value to cadets’ future USCG and civilian careers of all types.

  • Arctic Offshore Support Vessel

    Arctic Offshore Support Vessel (OSV) ('12 - '13)


    Three teams of senior NA&ME students were tasked with each designing a fleet of offshore support vessels. These vessels are intended to support exploration drilling operations off the coast of Alaska; as such, they must be capable of transiting long distances, working in extreme environmental conditions and performing a variety of missions. Additionally, designs are to incorporate the use of “green” energy technologies which will minimize the vessels’ carbon footprint and preserve the pristine beauty of Alaska’s Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.

    These design concepts were submitted to the 2013 SNAME/James A. Lisnyk International Student Ship Design Competition. In addition, one of these designs received an award at the 2013 SNAME New England Section Student Paper Competition.

  • Medium Endurance Cutter

    Medium Endurance Cutter (WMXX) ('12 - '13)


    Three teams of senior NA&ME students were tasked with each designing a concept vessel to resolve gaps in capabilities currently experienced by the aging fleet of medium endurance cutters. In addition, the WMXX serves as a low-cost risk mitigator to more expensive naval acquisition projects. The modern WMXX can be compared to a small naval combatant with the following discriminators: enhanced range, improved sea keeping, extended fatigue/service life and operation in low threat spectrum. Each design aims to achieve the traditional Coast Guard missions with an additional caveat; one vessel has disaster response capabilities, one vessel is ice capable and the last vessel has superior sea-keeping characteristics.

    These design concepts were submitted to the 2013 SNAME/James A. Lisnyk International Student Ship Design Competition. In addition, one of these designs received an award at the 2013 SNAME New England Section Student Paper Competition.

  • Ferry Design ImageFerry Design Illustration

    Roll-On, Roll-Off Ferry Design ('11 - '12)


    Two teams of senior NA&ME students were tasked with each designing a concept vessel for the transport of truck “containers” from Jacksonville, Florida to Bridgeport, Connecticut. The goal of the project was to transport at least 150 tractor trailer containers a day, thus removing this traffic from Route 95 and the adjacent the Eastern seaboard. Transport of the actual tractor/trucks was at the discretion of the design teams in accordance with their design philosophy and business model.

    These design concepts were submitted to the 2010-2012 SNAME/MARAD National Student Ship Design Competition and the 2012 SNAME/James A. Lisnyk International Student Ship Design Competition. One of the teams placed 3rd in the SNAME/MARAD competition. In addition, one of these designs received an award at the 2012 SNAME New England Section Student Paper Competition.

  • Mobile Offshore Base Design

    Mobile Offshore Base Design ('11 - '12)


    Two teams of senior NA&ME students were tasked with each designing a concept vessel to improve USCG execution of the alien migrant interdiction and counter-drug missions, with a focus on the Caribbean. The designed vessels were also required to fulfill an additional mission of supporting humanitarian relief and disaster response in the spirit of the Haiti earthquake, Hurricane Katrina, and the Japan Tsunami. The teams migrated to calling their ships “mother ships” and adopted a “patrol-boat-centric” approach to mission execution. Specifically, the at-sea missions were accomplished by using the mother ship to resupply/refuel a small fleet of 154 foot patrol boats for an extended period. The shore side mission was executed via student concepts for a ship-to-shore interface procedure with extensive supplies and logistics materials being disbursed from the ship to the affected near-shore areas.

    These design concepts were submitted to the 2012 SNAME/James A. Lisnyk International Student Ship Design Competition. In addition, one of these designs received an award at the 2012 SNAME New England Section Student Paper Competition.