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HALL OF HEROES
WALL OF GALLANTRY - 2006
  • Edward Smith thumb 
  • Donald McNeil thumb 
  • Edward C. Allen, Jr. thumb 
  • John Natwig thumb 
  • Roger Banner thumb 
  • Paul Henneberry thumb 
  • Stephen Ulmer thumb 
  • Lawrence Brudnicki thumb 
  • Jimmy Ng thumb 
  • Scott Genovese thumb 
  • Donald Bader thumb 
  • Thomas Cooper thumb 
  • Edward Smith photo

    Edward H. Smith

    Rear Admiral
    Class of 1913

    Distinguished Service Medal

    For service as set forth in the following citation:

     

    For exceptionally meritorious service to the Government of the United States in a duty of great responsibility as Commander of the Greenland Patrol and later as Commander of a Task force in the Atlantic Fleet from December 1941, to November 1944. During the critical years of 1942 and 1943, Rear Admiral Smith planned, built, organized and efficiently administered the naval bases and stations in Greenland and in the Arctic for the support of the Army in those areas and the Naval control of the North Atlantic. Under extremely difficult conditions, the forces of his command successfully operated patrols and escorts, maintained a system of weather stations and provided full logistic and tactical support for the Army. As Commander of a Task force in these strategic waters, he skillfully directed vital weather, patrol and escort services which were of inestimable assistance in connection with the ferrying of aircraft and the operation of transport planes to and from the European theaters of war and effectively protected valuable convoys. In all his negotiations and contacts, Rear Admiral Smith distinguished himself by his splendid diplomacy, sound judgment and intelligent planning and consistently maintained excellent relations with other United States forces and those of the Allied Nations. His superior tactical knowledge and steadfast devotion to duty throughout these important years were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

     

    Rear Admiral “Iceberg” Smith later commanded the Coast Guard’s Eastern Area and Third District before retiring after 40 years of service. (Download pdf) 

  • Donald McNeil photo

    Donald C. McNeil

    Captain
    Class of 1923

    Bronze Star Medal (with Combat Distinguishing Device “V”)

    For service as set forth in the following citation:

     

    For meritorious achievement as Commanding Officer of the USS Callaway, in action against enemy Japanese forces during the assault on Luzon, Philippine Islands, January 8, 1945. When his ship sustained serious damage from enemy aircraft, Captain McNeil skillfully directed the fire fighting activities and enabled his ship to participate in the assault landings. By his courage and devotion to duty, he upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

     

    Captain “Depth Charge” McNeil was selected for promotion to Rear Admiral, but died on active duty shortly after being relieved of command of USS Callaway. (Download pdf) 

  • Edward C. Allen, Jr. photo

    Edward C. Allen, Junior

    Lieutenant Commander
    Class of 1938

    Bronze Star Medal (with Combat Distinguishing Device “V”)

    For service as set forth in the following citation:

     

    For meritorious achievement as Navigator and as Gunnery Officer on board the USS Leonard Wood, during operations against the enemy at Luzon, Leyte, Angaur, Saipan, French Morocco, Sicily and the Gilbert and Marshall Island Groups, during World War II. Demonstrating excellent judgment and unerring seamanship, Lieutenant Commander Allen expertly piloted his ship through hazardous waters in the successful participation of the Leonard Wood in four major operations in the Pacific Area. Distinguishing himself as Gunnery Officer during the invasions of French Morocco, Sicily and the Gilbert and Marshall Island Groups, by maintaining his organization in an exceptionally high state of combat readiness, he contributed to the success of these vital operations. His steadfast courage, professional skill and untiring devotion to duty reflect great credit upon Lieutenant Commander Allen and the United States Naval Service.

     

    Lieutenant Commander Allen later commanded the Coast Guard’s Fifth District before retiring at the rank of Rear Admiral. (Download pdf) 

  • John Natwig photo

    John Natwig

    Lieutenant Commander
    Class of 1942

    Silver Lifesaving Medal

    For service as set forth in the following citation:

     

    For heroic action on 11 April 1952, when he rescued a boy from drowning in the Atlantic Ocean, off San Juan, Puerto Rico. Lieutenant Commander Natwig was serving as co-pilot of a Coast Guard PBY-5AG plane, which had landed to effect the rescue of survivors of a ditched Pan American DC-4 plane, when he saw a boy in the water holding up another boy whose head was submerged at times, and who appeared to be drowned. Without hesitation, and with complete disregard for his own personal safety, Lieutenant Commander Natwig climbed out of the co-pilot’s hatch and dove from the bow of the plane into the shark-infested water. He swam to the assistance of the unconscious boy and supported him until they were both taken aboard an Air Force plane approximately twenty-seven minutes later. Lieutenant Commander Natwig’s outstanding courage, initiative, and unwavering devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.

     

    Lieutenant Commander Natwig retired at the rank of Captain. (Download pdf) 

  • Paul Henneberry photo

    Paul D. Henneberry

    Commander
    Class of 1956

    Bronze Star Medal

    For service as set forth in the following citation:

     

    For meritorious service while serving as Commanding Officer of USCGC Bering Strait (WHEC-382) from 16 May 1970 to 1 January 1971 during combat operations. Commander Henneberry exhibited exceptional qualities of leadership while directing his ship through ninety-six naval gunfire support missions. Through his exceptional skill and devotion to duty, the ship maintained a high level of combat readiness and professional performance. This was accomplished simultaneously with the progressive replacement of Unites States Coast Guard officers and crew by Vietnamese officers and crew until ultimately his ship was manned completely with Vietnamese. This outstanding feat contributed directly to the success of the United State’s efforts in Southeast Asia. Commander Henneberry’s performance of duty reflected great credit upon himself and was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

     

    Commander Henneberry retired at the rank of Captain. (Download pdf) 

  • Stephen Ulmer photo

    Stephen T. Ulmer

    Lieutenant Junior Grade
    Class of 1963

    Silver Star Medal (with Combat Distinguishing Device “V”)

    For service as set forth in the following citation:

     

    For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as Commanding Officer, USCGC Point League (WPB 82304), Coast Guard Squadron ONE, engaged in MARKET TIME Operations to interdict Viet Cong infiltration attempts near the mouth of the Co Chien River on 20 June 1966. While on night patrol, POINT LEAGUE engaged a 100 foot armed supply vessel attempting to deliver a large cargo of arms and ammunition to the Viet Cong. For hours, Lieutenant (junior grade) Ulmer directed his command in a short-range gun battle with the infiltrator and forced her to ground on the beach. The enemy crew abandoned the vessel and made their way to the shore where they joined with Viet Cong forces. The fight then shifted to the beach where the Viet Cong forces, equipped with machine guns and heavier weapons, attempted to destroy the cutter and recoup the grounded vessel and its cargo. Point League, at first by itself and later joined by Point Slocum and Point Hudson, raked the enemy forces with the machine gun and mortar fire in exposing their positions to friendly aircraft support. Lieutenant (junior grade) Ulmer remained calm and in control despite his exposed position in the pilot house which took several hits, all of them penetrating the aluminum bulkheads. When a fire broke out in the grounded vessel, he organized a damage control party to suppress the flames to the point where Point League was able to come alongside and fight the fire. Lieutenant (junior grade) Ulmer’s valor, determination, and leadership were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.

     

    Lieutenant (junior grade) Ulmer resigned his commission in 1967 at the rank of Lieutenant in order to pursue the ministry. After graduating from Dallas Theological Seminary in 1972, Reverend Ulmer has served as a Baptist pastor in Arkansas, Iowa and Washington, and is still active today. (Download pdf) 

  • Lawrence Brudnicki photo

    Lawrence G. Brudnicki

    Commander
    Class of 1972

    Coast Guard Medal

    For service as set forth in the following citation:

     

    Commander Brudnicki is cited for heroism while serving as Commanding Officer of Coast Guard Cutter Tamaroa during the daring nighttime rescue of four survivors from a downed Air National Guard H-60 helicopter during one of the strongest storms in recorded history. On 30 October 1991, the pilot of an Air National Guard helicopter was forced to ditch his aircraft into the storm driven waves of the North Atlantic when strong winds prevent in-flight refueling. When a Coast Guard helicopter’s attempts to rescue the survivors were thwarted by high winds, Tamaroa became the helicopter crew’s only hope for survival. Commander Brudnicki quickly assessed the situation and recognized that Tamaroa’s propulsion limitations prevented a controlled approach to the survivors in the water. Instead, he directed Tamaroa to approach the downed air crew with the ship’s beam exposed to the towering waves and placed the cutter in an extremely vulnerable and unstable position. With the crew pushed to the limits of human endurance as a result of hurricane force winds, 56-degree seawater and 55 degree rolls, Commander Brudnicki skillfully orchestrated the rescue efforts of his operations, deck and engineering departments. For over two hours, Tamaroa violently pitched and rolled while Commander Brudnicki coordinated the efforts of the forecastle rescue team, conning officer, and engineering watch standers. Knowing that the waves crashing across the deck could wash the rescue team overboard, and that the extreme rolls could result in the capsizing of Tamaroa with its 80-person crew, Commander Brudnicki continually re-assessed the environmental conditions and the risks faced by the ship’s crew. Under his leadership and direction, Tamaroa’s crew persisted until all four airmen were safely recovered and received immediate medical treatment for hypothermia and other life-threatening injuries. Commander Brudnicki then re-focused his unit’s efforts on the search for one missing helicopter crewmember and coordinated multiple search assets over a 60,000 square mile area. Commander Brudnicki demonstrated remarkable seamanship, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger to himself and his crew. His unselfish actions, courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.

     

    Commander Brudnicki retired at the rank of Captain. (Download pdf) 

  • Jimmy Ng photo

    Jimmy Ng

    Lieutenant
    Class of 1972

    Distinguished Flying Cross

    For service as set forth in the following citation:

     

    Lieutenant Ng is cited for extraordinary achievement while participating in aerial flight on the evening of 17 August 1980. During this period he was serving as pilot and aircraft commander of Coast Guard HH-3F 1471 engaged in the rescue of 17 seamen from the merchant vessel Theresa Lee which was filling with deadly ammonia gas, disabled, and sinking in Bristol Bay, Alaska. Dispatched from Coast Guard Air Station, Kodiak, Alaska, Lieutenant Ng flew the aircraft through the remnant of one of the worst typhoons of the season to the scene. Upon arrival and despite darkness, poor visibility and turbulence in rain showers, Lieutenant Ng maneuvered the helicopter to a position over the violently pitching vessel as two dewatering pumps were lowered to the survivors. These pumps eventually saved the ship from sinking. Lieutenant Ng was now into his third launch of the day having accumulated 4.3 hours of flight time and eight hours of crew mission time on another SAR case. Facing fatigue and wind gusts of 65 knots and 40 foot seas combined with minimal visual references in the rain, Lieutenant Ng maintained his position above Theresa Lee until the 17 seamen had been hoisted to safety. With the fuel now a critical factor, Lieutenant Ng proceeded to the closest landing area, Port Heidon, Alaska. While enroute, the cockpit filled with dense smoke accompanied by the acrid odor of an electrical fire. Reacting immediately, Lieutenant Ng directed the performance of the appropriate emergency procedures which successfully resulted in the elimination of the problem. The helicopter was then safely landed at Port Heidon. Lieutenant Ng’s innovative actions, expert aeronautical skill and valor throughout this mission were instrumental in the successful rescue of the 17 seamen. His courage, sound judgment and unwavering devotion to duty are most heartily commended and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.

     

    Lieutenant Ng retired at the rank of Captain. (Download pdf) 

  • Scott Genovese photo

    Scott D. Genovese

    Captain
    Class of 1979

    Bronze Star Medal

    For service as set forth in the following citation:

     

    For meritorious achievement in connection with combat operations as Commanding Officer, USCGC Boutwell (WHEC 719) deployed with Commander, United States FIFTH Fleet from February to May 2003 in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM. Captain Genovese flawlessly led the crew of Boutwell during combat operations within the territorial waters of Iraq. Through tactical brilliance, Boutwell represented the first line of defense for the largest amphibious task force assembled since the Korean Conflict against the asymmetric and anti-ship cruise missile threat. He displayed extraordinary determination and bravery conducting maritime interception operations to enforce United Nations sanctions while maintaining a naval presence in Iraqi waters throughout combat operations. He dispatched his boarding teams to control steel hull and cargo dhows exiting the Shat al Arab, demonstrating coalition resolve in the North Arabian Gulf. In addition, he exhibited poise and leadership providing sea security in the vicinity of Iraqi oil terminals following their capture by coalition forces while simultaneously deescalating tensions along the Iranian border. His maintenance of a well-trained, truly professional crew directly contributed to the successful liberation of Iraq. Captain Genovese’s total effectiveness, forceful leadership, and loyal devotion to duty reflected great credit upon him and upheld the highest traditions of the Coast Guard and the United States Naval Service.

     

    Captain Genovese will retire in 2009 after 30 years of service. (Download pdf) 

  • Donald Bader photo

    Donald E. Bader

    Lieutenant Commander
    Class of 1994

    Distinguished Flying Cross

    For service as set forth in the following citation:

     

    Lieutenant Commander Bader is cited for extraordinary achievement while participating in aerial flight on the day and night of 8 May 2005 while rescuing three people from the sailing vessel Al Meisan. The vessel had been severely damaged and was sinking in a strong nor’easter 465 miles northeast of Air Station Elizabeth City, North Carolina. After rendezvousing with and refueling aboard the USS Trenton, Lieutenant Commander Bader executed a demanding launch with the ship at maximum pitch and role limits. Battling heavy rains and 50 to 70 knot winds, he bravely flew into the heart of the nor’easter toward the foundering vessel. Confronting a navigational computer failure, he wisely used the standby compass to dead reckon toward scene until the co-pilot was able to regain use of the onboard computer systems. Once on scene and unable to hoist directly to the vessel due to the violently pitching mast and angry sea state, he deployed the rescue swimmer into the turbulent seas near the vessel to aid in the rescue attempt. With winds in excess of 50 knots and 40 foot seas preventing the swimmer from reaching the vessel, he quickly recovered the swimmer to formulate an alternate plan. He again deployed the swimmer as one survivor at a time abandoned the stricken vessel. Demonstrating exceptional aeronautical skill, he recovered the first victim from the violent seas with a basket hoist. With the fuel state becoming critical, and the length of time required for a similar hoist in the deteriorating weather conditions, it was decided to use the rescue strop to recover the remaining two victims. Lieutenant Commander Bader twice again deployed the swimmer into the roiling seas, expertly recovering the survivors. With all three survivors and crew safely onboard, he adroitly flew through the stormy conditions for another 265 miles to Nantucket Island. Although hampered by darkness, fog and unrelenting rain, he landed safely with only 30 minutes of fuel remaining, accumulating over 12 hours of crew mission time and having flown over 800 nautical miles. Lieutenant Commander Bader’s actions, aeronautical skill and heroism were instrumental in the rescue of three people. His courage, judgment, and devotion to duty in the face of hazardous flying conditions are most heartily commended and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.

     

    Lieutenant Commander Bader remains on active duty. (Download pdf) 

  • Thomas Cooper photo

    Thomas F. Cooper

    Lieutenant Commander
    Class of 1994

    Distinguished Flying Cross

    For service as set forth in the following citation:

     

    Lieutenant Commander Cooper is cited for extraordinary achievement while participating in aerial flight from 29 August to 6 September 2005, while serving as Aircraft Commander aboard Coast Guard HH-65B helicopters in response to Hurricane Katrina. Demonstrating exceptional aeronautical skill and judgment, and innovative rescue techniques, he saved numerous survivors from treacherous conditions during 15 sorties, totaling over 29 day and night flight hours, including 13 hours as a single pilot. He repeatedly and skillfully pushed the power-limited HH-65B to the very edge of its performance envelope, in close proximity to unlit hazards, despite continuous reports of violence and shots fired, thousands of distressed survivors needing rescue, and the constant threat of midair collision in the highly congested and uncontrolled airspace. As the first aircraft on scene after the storm’s passage, his initial recommendations laid the procedural foundation for the entire air rescue operation. Battling winds in excess of 50 knots, he adeptly hoisted a pregnant woman from a small, constricted balcony, the first rescue in metropolitan New Orleans. Most notably, he completed a pinpoint vertical rescue swimmer pick-up of a 400 pound, non-ambulatory survivor directly from her second story bed through the damaged rafters and roof. In addition, he held a precise hover within five feet of power lines at night to deftly thread the hoist cable through a web of obstructions, saving an elderly couple off a small third story porch. Balancing power limitations against the urgent need to hoist survivors as floodwaters rose; he landed “light” on a semi-rigid rooftop, rescuing 12 trapped people. He kept his crew focused in the face of an overwhelming disaster and the stress of repeated life or death decisions about who to rescue and who to leave behind. He intrepidly continued hoisting and saving lives after being warned by authorities about a toxic cloud of hydrogen sulfide in the area, refusing to abandon the mission. Lieutenant Commander Cooper’s actions, aeronautical skill, and valor were instrumental in the rescue of 146 victims. His courage, judgment and devotion to duty are most heartily commended and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.

     

    Lieutenant Commander Cooper remains on active duty. (Download pdf)