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HALL OF HEROES
WALL OF GALLANTRY - 2011
  • Frederick Billard thumb 
  • John Byrd thumb 
  • Frank Leamy thumb 
  • Carl Olsen thumb 
  • Joseph Bresnan thumb 
  • Joseph Crowe thumb 
  • Robert Long thumb 
  • Terry Sinclair thumb 
  • John McBride thumb 
  • Robert Potter thumb 
  • Brian McLaughlin thumb 
  • Frederick Billard photo

    Frederick C. Billard

    Captain
    Class of 1896

    Navy Cross

    For service as set forth in the following Citation:

     

    For distinguished service in the line of his profession as Commanding Officer of the U.S.S. Aphrodite, engaged in the important, exacting and hazardous duty of transporting and escorting troops and supplies through waters infested with enemy submarines and mines.

     

    Captain Billard was later appointed as the Superintendent of the Coast Guard Academy. He died in office at the rank of Rear Admiral while serving his third consecutive term as Commandant of the Coast Guard. (Download pdf) 

  • John Byrd photo

    John H. Byrd

    Captain
    CLASS

    Class of 1925

    For service as set forth in the following Citation:

     

    For exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance of outstanding services to the Government of the United States during operations against enemy forces while serving as Atlantic Fleet Escort Commander protecting trans-Atlantic convoys during World War II. Undeterred by the hazards of enemy submarine-infested waters and adverse weather conditions, Captain Byrd skillfully directed the ships under his command in fulfilling the difficult assignment of transporting men and supplies to sustain the Allied war fronts in Europe. By his sound judgment and professional skill, he contributed materially to the prosecution of the war in this area and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. (Download pdf) 

  • Frank Leamy photo

    Frank A. Leamy

    Lieutenant Commander
    Class of 1925

    Distinguished Flying Cross

    For service as set forth in the following Citation:

     

    In recognition of your outstanding performance, on May 21, 1937, in flying an airplane of the Coast Guard a distance of approximately sixty miles from the Salem Air Station, to contact the trawler White Cap, in the open sea, and removing from that trawler an officer whose left arm had been severed. The patient was then safely transported to Salem, Massachusetts, for emergency treatment and further hospitalization. The flight was made under adverse conditions and rough seas, which made landing and take-off hazardous.

     

    Lieutenant Commander Leamy retired at the rank of Rear Admiral after serving as the 22nd Superintendent of the U.S. Coast Guard Academy. (Download pdf) 

  • Carl Olsen photo

    Carl B. Olsen

    Lieutenant
    Class of 1928

    Distinguished Flying Cross

    For service as set forth in the following Citation:

     

    In recognition of outstanding heroic action in flying an airplane of the Coast Guard approximately 300 miles to sea under the difficulties of darkness, storms and rough seas for the purpose of removing and transporting to a hospital on shore an officer of the Army, on board the United States Army Transport Republic, who was critically ill, saving his life.

     

    Lieutenant Olsen went on to serve as Commandant of Cadets and retired at the rank of Rear Admiral after serving as the Eighth District Commander. (Download pdf) 

  • Joseph Bresnan photo

    Joseph A. Bresnan

    Commander
    Class of 1932

    Bronze Star Medal (with Combat Distinguishing Device “V”)

    For service as set forth in the following Citation:

     

    For meritorious performance of duty in the performance of outstanding services, as a Deputy Assault Group Commander in the assault on the coast of France, 6 June, 1944. Commander Bresnan took station close to the beach under heavy assault enemy fire on the day of the assault. He remained under fire during the most bitter period of the fighting, when, with great coolness, he made decisions on the spot, reorganized, grouped and dispatched craft to the beach and made the weight of his judgment felt in a manner which contributed materially to the success of the operation. The initiative and skill displayed by Commander Bresnan on this occasion were in keeping with the highest tradition of the United States Naval Service.

     

    Commander Bresnan retired at the rank of Captain. (Download pdf) 

  • Joseph Crowe photo

    Joseph L. Crowe

    Lieutenant Commander
    Class of 1962

    Distinguished Flying Cross (Gold Star in lieu of a third)

    For service as set forth in the following Citation:

     

    Lieutenant Commander Crowe is cited for extraordinary achievement while participating in aerial flight on the morning of 4 April, 1975 while serving as aircraft commander of Coast Guard HH-3F helicopter engaged in the perilous rescue of eight crewmen from the Liberian tanker Spartan Lady, which had broken in half in raging seas and hurricane force winds approximately 145 miles south of Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Dispatched from Coast Guard Air Station, Cape Cod in a blinding snowstorm, Lieutenant Commander Crowe skillfully piloted the helicopter to the stricken vessel, whose bow and stern sections had drifted about two miles apart in the 20 to 30 foot seas and was directed to evacuate eight stranded crewmen from the bow section. Despite 60-knot winds and limited visibility, Lieutenant Commander Crowe expertly maneuvered the helicopter over the stricken vessel and after repeated attempts, improvised a method of getting the trail line to the bow section which was pitching and rolling violently in the mountainous seas. He then established a hover altitude in excess of 100 feet over the severely inclined deck of the bow and maintained this position for 45 minutes, avoiding the wildly swinging 100-foot mast, until all survivors were hoisted to safety. Upon completion of the arduous hoist operation, Lieutenant Commander Crowe immediately departed the area due to a low fuel state and encountered further deteriorating weather conditions as he approached his destination. With no suitable alternatives, he skillfully and precisely executed an approach to a runway with the lowest authorized descent altitude despite a 50-degree gusty crosswind and safely landed the helicopter and deplaned the survivors to waiting ambulances. Lieutenant Commander Crowe’s innovative actions, expert aeronautical skills, and dauntless valor throughout this perilous mission resulted in saving the lives of eight crewmen. His heroic courage, sound judgment, and unwavering devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.

     

    Lieutenant Commander Crowe retired at the rank of Captain. (Download pdf) 

  • Robert Long photo

    Robert E. Long

    Lieutenant
    Class of 1967

    Distinguished Flying Cross

    For service as set forth in the following Citation:

     

    Lieutenant Robert E. Long distinguished himself by heroism while participating in aerial flight as an Aircraft Commander of an HH-53C Rescue Helicopter at Nakhon Phanom Royal Thai Air Base, Thailand on 27 December 1972. On that date, Lieutenant Long voluntarily flew into a highly hostile and heavily defended area of North Vietnam to attempt the rescue of a downed American airman. When his wingman’s aircraft was severely damaged during the rescue attempt, Lieutenant Long provided invaluable assistance in locating a crash landing site and then landed and recovered the entire crew of the downed helicopter. The outstanding heroism and selfless devotion to duty displayed by Lieutenant Long reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.

     

    Lieutenant Long retired at the rank of Commander. (Download pdf) 

  • Terry Sinclair photo

    Terry W. Sinclair

    Lieutenant Junior Grade
    Class of 1967

    Coast Guard Medal

    For service as set forth in the following Citation:

     

    Lieutenant Sinclair is cited for heroism on the afternoon of 12 April 1970 as copilot of Coast Guard HH-52A 1386 helicopter engaged in the perilous rescue of a survivor from an aircraft crash in the surf near Point Ano Nueva, California. Upon reaching an area 250 yards offshore, the survivor was sighted in the water. Although hampered by 6 to 8-foot seas and 10 to 12-foot waves, which prevented water landing, the helicopter was maneuvered into a hover over the helpless victim, and Lieutenant Sinclair was lowered inside the rescue basket. Upon reaching the unconscious man with remarkable effort, Lieutenant Sinclair succeeded in securing him into the basket. While the critically injured man was safely hoisted aboard the helicopter and flown to safety, Lieutenant Sinclair remained in the water. Lieutenant Sinclair was later retrieved by the helicopter. His outstanding initiative, exceptional fortitude, and daring in spite of imminent personal danger were constantly demonstrated throughout this mission. Lieutenant Sinclair’s unselfish actions, remarkable courage, and unwavering devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Coast Guard.

     

    Lieutenant Junior Grade Sinclair retired at the rank of Captain. (Download pdf) 

  • John McBride photo

    John McBride

    Lieutenant Junior Grade
    Class of 1968

    Navy Commendation Medal

    For service as set forth in the following Citation:

     

    For meritorious service while attached to and serving in USCGC Yakutat (WHEC-380) as Damage Control Officer during the period of 3 August to 4 August 1970 during combat operations. Lieutenant (junior grade) McBride led a rescue and assistance party to the Jennings Country where a serious engine room fire had reflashed out of control. His accurate appraisal of the gravity of the situation resulted in bringing the Yakutat alongside with minimum delay. His outstanding on the scene coordination and direction of the fire fighters contributed significantly toward isolating and extinguishing the fire. Lieutenant (junior grade) McBride’s professionalism and devotion to duty reflected great credit upon himself and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

     

    Lieutenant Junior Grade McBride retired at the rank of Captain. (Download pdf) 

  • Robert Potter photo

    Robert H. Potter

    Lieutenant
    Class of 1999

    Distinguished Flying Cross

    For service as set forth in the following Citation:

     

    Lieutenant Potter is cited for extraordinary achievement while participating in aerial flight as the Aircraft Commander of Coast Guard Jayhawk helicopter CG-6022 during the early morning hours of 4 December 2007. Immediately after launching from Air Station Astoria, Oregon, during a winter storm of record ferocity, Lieutenant Potter encountered torrential rain, severe turbulence, poor visibility, gale force wind and darkness. Despite these treacherous conditions, he navigated 90 miles across terrain largely blacked-out by power outages and performed a series of inland rescue missions marked by dangerous terrain, hypothermic victims, and poor communications. Upon arriving over Chehalis, Washington, where hundreds of people were trapped and endangered by cold, rapidly rising floodwater, Lieutenant Potter demonstrated exceptional courage and innovation while rescuing people from dark and inundated homes. With the barest clearance from obstacles, he maneuvered his aircraft among tall trees and live power lines expertly hovering at high altitudes over small targets obscured by darkness and covered by debris. Demonstrating exemplary leadership and superb aeronautical acumen, Lieutenant Potter innovatively approached and completed numerous difficult rescues. He guided his crew through 25 complex hoists and nine perilous deployments of the rescue swimmer while fighting fatigue and overcoming extraordinary environmental hazards. During this six-and-one-half hour mission, Lieutenant Potter’s actions, aeronautical skill and heroism were instrumental in the rescue of 21 people. His courage, judgment, and devotion to duty in the face of hazardous flying conditions are most heartily commended and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.

     

    Lieutenant Commander Potter remains on active duty. (Download pdf) 

  • Brian McLaughlin photo

    Brian J. McLaughlin

    Lieutenant
    Class of 1999

    Air Medal

    For service as set forth in the following Citation:

     

    Lieutenant McLaughlin is cited for meritorious achievement in aerial flight on 23 March 2008 while serving as Aircraft Commander aboard Coast Guard MH-60J helicopter CGNR 6007 while responding to the sinking of the F/V Alaska Ranger, 125 miles west of Dutch Harbor, Alaska. Forward-deployed to St. Paul Island, the crew conducted an early morning launch in response to a distress call reporting uncontrolled flooding on the 192-foot, catcher-processor with 47 persons on board. Battling 30-knot winds, heavy snow squalls and near zero visibility, Lieutenant McLaughlin witnessed an epic scattering of dimly lit strobe lights from the mariners who had abandoned ship into the frigid sea. Exhibiting superior leadership, Lieutenant McLaughlin directed the crew to jettison the aircraft’s dewatering pump and crew raft, maximizing space for survivors. Faced with the heart wrenching reality of facing more people in the water than could fit into his aircraft, Lieutenant McLaughlin skillfully triaged the scene, selecting to recover those survivors drifting furthest from the life rafts. Demonstrating exceptional leadership, Lieutenant McLaughlin expertly synergized his crew’s efforts to safely execute 40 open-sea hoist evolutions through periods of vertigo-inducing snow squalls and minus 24-degree wind-chill. Making the difficult decision to cease recoveries when the aircraft reached capacity, Lieutenant McLaughlin skillfully navigated CGNR 6007 back to USCGC Munro, where all of the survivors were safely delivered. After conducting a hazardous night in-flight refueling evolution with USCGC Munro, Lieutenant McLaughlin and his crew returned to scene where they recovered three more survivors from the wind-swept seas. Lieutenant McLaughlin’s actions and aeronautical skill were instrumental in saving 15 people from certain death in the Bering Sea. His courage, judgment and devotion to duty are most heartily commended and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Coast Guard.

     

    Lieutenant Commander McLaughlin remains on active duty. (Download pdf)